18-25 September: Return to the country

Author: Mrs A

Location: Kenilworth and surrounds, Sunshine Coast Hinterland, Queensland, Australia

Just when we thought our rainforest visiting days were over we decided to book in at the showgrounds in Kenilworth for a few days.

If you are unfamiliar with showgrounds (you may have noticed we have stayed on quite a few), a showground is a community run area of ground on which country shows – rodeos, livestock sales and comptitions and horse riding trials are held. Outside of major events, the land sits empty, so many towns have turned them into campgrounds, providing power and water to a number of sites as well as offering unpowered spots. We like them because they tend to be more bushy and spread out than caravan parks, and money earned from our fees goes back into improving the community facilities.

It was a breath of fresh air arriving in Kenilworth, after the frenzied school holidays crowds flocking to our Didillibah campsite, children keen to enjoy the water slides and jumping pillows on offer there. Although there were children around, mostly they were busy playing games on the oval or riding their bikes around the quiet driveways.

The overwhelming sound we first noticed was of birds in their hundreds, flocking to the flowering callistemon trees around the park. As well as Rainbow Lorikeets and Pale-headed Rosellas, there were dozens of tiny Scarlet Myzomelas, a challenge to see as they are so similar in colour to the flowers.

Bottlebrush flowers are clearly a favourite for these little red, black and white birds
Scarlet Myzomela
Hundreds of Rainbow Lorikeets flock here also to enjoy the sweet nectar
Another type of honeyeater, a Noisy Friarbird on Kniphofia flowers
Princess Tassie approved of the fine sunny weather we had here

Kenilworth is situated in a rural setting ringed by national parks and state forests in all directions, the green rolling hills reminding us somewhat of England on a fine sunny day. It sits in the Mary River valley, and the river itself runs just behind the showground.

Sunset from the campground

All this natural environment makes for a wildlife filled location and we ticked off more than 35 different species of bird just footsteps from our caravan!

A Brown Cuckoo Dove flies up from the woodland floor and eyes me suspiciously
One of several Laughing Kookaburras on the site which entertain us each evening with their cackling calls
Another Laughing Kookaburra
A Fan-tailed Cuckoo with its gorgeous bright eye

We were reminded in no uncertain terms that (despite the temperature reaching over 30 degrees centigrade on a couple of the days we were there) it is spring, and many of the birds were busy building nests, collecting food to feed young, and often in their vibrant mating colours. It is a great time to be spotting birds.

A pair of Maned Ducks have a very cute clutch of six chicks
A Blue-faced Honeyeater with a beak full of insects to feed its hungry family
Leaden Flycatcher – this one was collecting horse hair from the edge of the paddock, presumably to line a nest

In addition to the many birds around, on one walk we even spotted a large Australian Water Dragon, located where I had previously seen the ducklings. I was so worried that they were missing I checked to see whether duckling might be on the Water Dragon’s dinner list – fortunately not, they prefer insects and the odd baby mouse!

An Australian Water Dragon – this adult was about 1 metre long (nose to tip of tail). Their diet consists mostly of insects (though they will eat small mice) and they live for about 20 years

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The Mary River is about a 10 minute walk from the campsite, following a mown grass tree lined pathway which leads down to the river’s edge.

We came to this region back in 2018 when we organised a Zoner’s Muster at Kenilworth Camping, a farm camping area on the banks of this river further downstream. Back then we had paddled 4.5km in our inflatable pack rafts and had a great time with some of our Zoner (owners of Zone RV caravans) friends. So it was really fitting when our friends Phil and Libby, who had been there with us too, decided they hadn’t quite had enough of us in Noosa, and that they would drive up with their granddaughters, Ava and Hayley, for the day.

Hayley didn’t hesitate to jump in the river for a paddle, while Ava took time to learn how to skim stones. The water was definitely too shallow for kayaking and we certainly could not have managed the trip we did three and a half years ago.

Ava learning to skim stones while Hayley paddles in the shallow river

We were reminded that the river is home to more than fish, turtles and birds, when sharp-eyed Hayley pointed out a Red-bellied Black Snake slithering along the riverbank into the undergrowth. This one was just a baby – on another visit down to the water Mr A came rushing along the bank towards me ashen faced – a 2 metre long adult had just emerged from the water swiftly retreating into the reeds just centimetres in front of him. We steered clear from reeds and grasses after that!

Red-bellied Black-snake – venomous but shy unless they feel threatened

Mark and I visited the Mary River on a few occasions, every time rewarding us with new sightings – like these gorgeous Red-browed Firetails – tiny finches often heard but rarely seen.

Bath time for the flock
One very wet Firetail!

And little insect loving Red-backed Fairywrens flitting through the Casuarina trees (River Sheoaks) and grasses.

Looking magnificent in his breeding colours, a male Red-backed Fairywren
A female Red-backed Fairy Wren with not a speck of red to be seen
Red-backed Fairywren

The river is also home to many more traditional water lovers, including Little Pied Cormorants, Intermediate and Great Egrets, Herons, Dotterels and more.

White-faced Heron standing statuesque on the riverbank
A tiny pair of Black-fronted Dotterels run energetically along the sand and gravel banks

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A short 10 minute drive from Kenilworth is a small area of ancient rainforest, home to the Fig Tree Walk. The boardwalk takes visitors on a short educational trail through the forest, explaining about the trees and the lifecycle within this special environment. Mark and I visited on two occasions, the second time bringing along Libby and Phil and the kids for an explore to finish their day out.

Stunning forest – Phil must be telling me a shocking story (else I am yawning!)
Group photo (Mr A is photographer)
Yes…keep on scrolling – this is a tall one! 150 years of growing, this tree is not yet finished…we feel dwarfed amongst its roots

An attempt to portray some of the majesty of the towering trees in the forest

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Mapleton National Park is located 24km west of Kenilworth and was the location for another trip during our week. We combined a couple of walks (map), hiking the short but picturesque Linda Garret Circuit and tagging on some of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk (just shy of 60km in total – we only did a couple of kilometres each way!).

Our walk starts with a lookout with views over the Obi Obi Valley
Looking across the valley

Amazingly I spotted another Tawny Frogmouth sleeping alongside the path – these nocturnal birds are not owls or related to them. They have a wide beak rather than hooked, designed for catching moths on the fly, and their feet are not talons, rather just designed for gripping a branch, more similar to a pigeon’s toes.

Tawny Frogmouth
A tiny Brown Thornbill, one of a flock spotted flitting energetically through the undergrowth hunting for insects
Mr A surrounded by palms
A gorgeous Lewin’s Honeyeater with its crescent yellow patch and creamy yellow gape (outer edge of mouth). Lewin’s Honeyeater is named after an English artist, John Lewin, who travelled to Australia in the early 1800s to paint the wildlife. He originally called this bird the ‘Yellow-eared Honeysucker’
Loving the intricacy of these roots

The walks in this area seemed to have fewer ground-dwelling birds, perhaps because the village is so close and domestic cats and maybe even foxes have killed them. There were plenty of yellow robins flitting through the trees though, chasing insects we disturbed on our walk.

Eastern Yellow Robin
Pale-yellow Robin

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Conondale National Park is also not far from Kenilworth. Just a 20 minute drive and you reach a 4WD only track, where three water crossings deliver you to Boolumba Creek Day use area. From there you can start the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Great Walk or chose from a selection of shorter routes.

Mr A crossing one of the creek beds

We visited on a couple of occasions, loving the area rich with untouched rainforest, the constant hum of insects and chatter of birds addictive.

Mr A ready for action on one of our walks to an old gold mine shaft (map)
Not a peaceful place, the rainforest is noisy, full of bird calls and the constant hum of insects
Hard to see, a ground dwelling Longrunner bird rummaging through the leaves
A gorgeous Crested Shrike-tit flies in for a visit
Photographing birds up in the trees
A Rufous Shrikethrush
Large-billed Scrubwren
A White-browed Scrubwren feeds its fledgling a rather large beetle
Many butterflies add a touch of colour to our walks
A Noisy Pitta – so exciting to capture this photo of this colourful ground dwelling bird in its natural habitat.

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Imbil State Forest and the Charlie Moreland Campground are about a 15 minute drive from Kenilworth, and another location you can walk from. We combined two short walks, the Little Yabba and Piccabeen circuits which took us away from the busy camping area (we estimated around 100 people by the number of caravans, whizz-bangs (camper vans!) camper trailers, and tents) and over a small creek and into the forest. Despite the crowds at the campground, once we left the small day visitor car park and crossed the creek, we didn’t see another human for more than 2 hours!

The birdlife was prolific, starting with more Scalet Myzomelas feeding as we crossed the water, and continuing as we spotted Golden Whistlers, fantails, Fairywrens and more.

Golden Whistler (female)

It didn’t look as though many people had recently taken the longer Piccabeen circuit, as we had to clamber over a recently fallen tree to continue round. It was worth it though, with several species of bird in the forest, and the temperature cooling as nature’s air conditioning kicked in.

Piccabeen Palms – these 20 metre tall trees are native and attract many birds
Brown Cuckoo-Dove – look at that magnificent tail!
A White-naped Honeyeater flies down to a rainforest stream
Mr A swamped by another rainforest giant
The views open up as we climb
Beautiful flowers

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On Friday we had a coincidental surprise visit from our friends Carol and Nick Gray, who had (unbeknownst to us) been having some work conducted on their caravan in Coolum Beach, and decided to camp here a few nights once they had their van back. We first met them when we were staying in the Margaret River in Western Australia back in 2017 on our first lap around Australia when they were interested in buying a. Zone. We showed them around our van and Mr A did such a good sales job they ended up buying one!

Although we have met up with them on several occasions over the years, this was the first time we had seen their new van, ironically on the same day we heard we had officially sold ours. It felt like our Australian travels had come full circle as we once again shared food and wine with our travelling friends.

A pair of Zones
Mark and Nick enjoy some Saturday night beers
A final farewell on Sunday morning – L-R: Mr A, Carol and Nick Gray, Mrs A

We enjoyed a couple of fun evenings with them before we headed off for our final week in our home on wheels.

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I conclude my post with a poem which was displayed at a reserve near the Fig Tree Walk, which feels quite poignant at this time when our life and travels in Australia are nearing the end.

We are certain there will be ‘boulders’ in our future, as there have been in our past. It is always good to be reminded that these boulders do fade with time and become much smaller issues, with somewhat smoother edges.

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